Nursing Homes Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis
COVID-19 has drastically altered life for residents of nursing homes.

Nursing Homes Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis

Yahoo Finance’s recent article entitled “U.S. nursing homes face ‘a crisis on top of a crisis’ with coronavirus and funding woes” explains that the nursing home industry has been facing a financial shortfall since at least 2013, particularly for non-Medicare margins, according to the American Health Care Association (AHCA). Non-Medicare margins are the revenues and costs associated with Medicaid and private payers for all lines of business. They dropped 3% in 2018, an increase from the year prior. The industry has been in financial disarray long before the COVID-19 crisis.

Lack of funding is a big issue for nursing homes. “You layer COVID on top of that and… it’s a crisis on top of a crisis,” David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School, told Yahoo Finance. “And that you started with a lot of nursing homes that didn’t have adequate staffing models, weren’t exactly strong at infection control, lacked resources in many, many regards, and then this hits, it’s definitely the industry.”

“Over 60% of people in the country that live in nursing facilities are dependent upon Medicaid,” AHCA President and CEO Mark Parkinson told Yahoo Finance. “And unfortunately, in most states, the Medicaid rates have been set at less than the actual cost to take care of the residents. So, it makes it very difficult to provide the kind of care that providers want when they’re underfunded so dramatically.”

In addition, Parkinson commented, “most of the people don’t understand that Medicaid is really a middle-class benefit, because if people live long enough to outlive their resources, it’s the only way that they can afford to be taken care of in a facility.”

Medicaid is a federal benefits program that gives health coverage to seniors, pregnant women, children, people with disabilities and eligible low-income adults. However, the federal government permits states to level the payment amounts long as they meet federal requirements.

“The failure to adequately fund Medicaid is primarily a problem with the states,” Parkinson said. “Each state gets to make its own decision on what its reimbursement will be for Medicaid. Although the national average is around $200 a day, the rate varies dramatically by states, and some states are as low as less than $150 a day. In the low funding states, like Illinois and Texas, the politicians just haven’t decided it’s an important enough priority to adequately fund it.”

According to the New York Times, the COVID-19 crisis that has swept the nation has infected more than 282,000 people at about 12,000 facilities as of June 26. It has killed more than 54,000. There are roughly 15,600 nursing homes in the U.S., with more than 1.3 million residents and over 1.6 million staff.

“It’s important to note that COVID hasn’t discriminated, so it’s not just those worst-quality nursing homes that have seen cases,” Grabowski said. “It’s been equally apparent across the high quality and low-quality facilities, high Medicaid and low Medicaid facilities. We’ve found that it’s really about where you’re located that has driven these cases.”

Adding to the financial situation is the fact that testing for coronavirus in the thousands of nursing homes across the country can be very expensive. The AHCA and National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL) found that testing every U.S. nursing home resident and staff member just once, would cost $440 million. As the pandemic continues, more supplies are also needed. A recent NCAL survey found that many assisted living communities are running low on PPE (N95 masks, surgical face masks, face shields, gowns, and gloves).

Parkinson says, it’s a “failure to recognize the importance of the elderly. It’s a conscious political decision to underfund elder care,” he said. “It’s not defensible on any level, but it’s occurring in the vast majority of states.”

Nursing homes were hardly prepared for the COVID-19 crisis. He went on to say that with more funding, nursing homes can be better prepared for the next health crisis.

Reference: Yahoo Finance (June 30, 2020) “U.S. nursing homes face ‘a crisis on top of a crisis’ with coronavirus and funding woes”

Special Needs Planning for Parents
Individuals with special needs require special consideration in estate planning.

Special Needs Planning for Parents

Public benefits for individuals with special needs include health care, supplemental income, and resources, like day programs and other vital services. Some benefits are based on the individual’s disability status, but others are “needs tested,” where eligibility is determined based on financial resources, as explained in the article “Planning for loved ones with special needs” from NWTimes.com. This distinction is an important consideration in estate planning.

Needs testing” is something that parents must address as part of special needs planning, in concert with their own estate planning. This ensures that the individual’s government benefits will continue, while their family has the comfort of knowing that after the parents die, their child may have access to resources to cover additional costs and maintain a quality of life they may not otherwise have.

Families must be very careful to make informed planning decisions, otherwise their loved ones may lose the benefits they rely upon.

A variety of special planning tools may be used, and the importance of skilled help from an elder law estate planning attorney cannot be overstated.

One family received a “re-determination” letter from the Social Security Administration. This is the process whereby the SSA scrutinizes a person’s eligibility for benefits, based on their possible access to other non-governmental resources. Once the process begins, the potential exists for a disabled person to lose benefits or be required to pay back benefits if they were deemed to have wrongfully received them.

In this case, a woman who lived in California, engaged in a periodic phone call with California Medicaid. California is known for aggressively pursuing on-going benefits eligibility. The woman mentioned a trust that had been created as a result of estate planning done by her late father. The brief mention was enough to spark an in-depth review of planning. The SSA requested no less than 15 different items, including estate documents, account history and a review of all disbursements for the last two years.

The process has created a tremendous amount of stress for the woman and for her family. The re-determination will also create expenses, as the attorney who drafted the original trust in Indiana, where the father lived, will need to work with a special needs attorney in California, who is knowledgeable about the process in the state.

Similar to estate planning, the special needs process required by Medicaid and the SSA is a constantly evolving process, and not a “one-and-done” transaction. Special needs and estate planning documents created as recently as three or four years ago should be reviewed.

Our specialized team has the tools to tackle your estate planning needs, from Medicaid support to planning for people with special needs.

Reference: NWTimes.com (June 21, 2020) “Planning for loved ones with special needs”

Why Customize Your Estate Plan?
Customize your estate plan to reflect the needs and wants of your family.

Why Customize Your Estate Plan?

A well-written estate plan is customized and unique. The only thing worse than having no estate plan, is an estate plan created from a ‘fill-in-the-blank’ form, according to the recent article “Don’t settle for a generic estate plan” from The News-Enterprise. Compare estate planning to buying a home. Before you start packing, you think about the kind of house you want and how much you can spend. You also talk with real estate agents and mortgage brokers to get ready. The planning process is detailed, and more importantly, catered to your needs and wants.

Even when you find a house you love, you don’t write a check right away. You hire an engineer to inspect the property. You might even bring in contractors for repair estimates. At some point, you contact an insurance agent to learn how much it will cost to protect the house. You rely on professionals, because buying a home is an expensive proposition and you want to be sure it will suit your needs and be a sound investment.

The same process goes for your estate plan. Consulting a skilled professional, an estate planning attorney, will prove to be worthwhile in the long run. You may even consider weighing input from trusted family or friends. It is important to work with a professional attorney who will offer expert advice in customizing your estate plan.

An estate planning attorney will also help you to avoid problems you may not anticipate. If the family includes an individual with special needs, leaving money to that person could result in their losing government benefits. Giving property to an adult child to try to avoid nursing home costs could backfire, making you ineligible for Medicaid coverage and cause your offspring to have an unexpected tax bill. These are the very considerations that our team makes in preparing your personalized estate plan.

To the surprise of many, once your estate plan is completed, it’s not done yet. It is important to communicate your estate plan with the necessary parties. Make sure that the people who need to have original documents—like a power of attorney—have these documents, or tell them where they can be found when needed. Keep in mind that many financial institutions will only accept their own power of attorney forms, so you may need to include those in your estate plan. Medical documents, like advance directives and healthcare powers of attorney, should be given to the people you selected to make decisions on your behalf. Make a list of the documents in your customized estate plan and where they can be found.

Preparing an estate plan is not just signing a series of fill-in-the-blank forms. A well-done estate plan is customized and unique. An estate plan, after all, is a means of protecting and passing down the legacy that you have devoted a lifetime to creating, no matter its size.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (June 23, 2020) “Don’t settle for a generic estate plan”