Talk to a Parent Suffering from Dementia during the Pandemic

If you have a parent living in an assisted living facility or a nursing home, or they’re at home, caregivers need to know how to explain the current coronavirus pandemic in an appropriate and clear manner—and in a way that protects and cares for your own personal health. With the busy holiday season behind us, you may have noticed new struggles with your parents.

Long Island Weekly’s recent article entitled “Caregiving During The Coronavirus” explains that older adults often have more health complications, like heart disease, diabetes and hypertension. As a result, they’re more susceptible to the complications of the coronavirus. Review the recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) for protecting you and your family, especially your elder parents, from exposure.

And although some people suffering from Alzheimer’s or dementia may not fully understand the complexity and severity that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on our communities, they can sense what’s happening. They can read your personal energy and can sense your stress. This may cause them to show more symptoms of anxiety, agitation, cognitive decline and confusion. Communicate as best you can to your parent frequently and clearly about what’s happening. While they may not need to have all the details, let them know that there’s a virus spreading within the community and that we need to wash our hands thoroughly and stay indoors.

For those still being cared for at home, take the necessary precautions as you’d do for yourself. Modify your grocery shopping trips, since stores are adding special senior hours, reschedule unnecessary doctor visits, stock up on needed medications and talk to your doctors about any concerns.

For those in a facility, understand the visitation policies, because many have adjusted their policies to limit or prohibit personal visitation. Ask the administration about visitation and what your parent’s care facility is doing to ensure for proper care.

Although you might be frustrated that your parent’s facility is limiting or cancelling visitation, remember that the new rules are designed to protect the residents. You may be able to schedule a time to speak with your mother or father on the phone every few days, or you can deliver food or items, like photos albums or other gifts to stay connected. Try to be reasonable and understand that these facilities may be understaffed.

Here are a few key points that may be helpful to get through this crisis:

  • Have a talk with your parent and with the facilities in which they’re living, so they can understand the new policies.
  • Be careful yourself. Take reasonable precautions for yourself and your family member.
  • Avoid public spaces. This includes routine, or non-essential doctor visits, grocery shopping and other visits.
  • Stay upbeat. Know the latest news and guidelines but try to remain calm, because your parent may sense your stress and reflect that.

Be reasonable and understanding and try your best in these uncertain times—for yourself and your parents.

Reference: Long Island Weekly (April 12, 2020) “Caregiving During The Coronavirus”

Suggested Key Terms: Elder Law Attorney, Assisted Living, Nursing Home Care, Disability, Elder Care, Caregiving, Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease

Will the Pandemic Affect My Social Security?

Kiplinger’s recent article entitled “Social Security Shocker: Pandemic to Reduce Benefits by 9% for Americans Turning 60 in 2020” explains that retirees can mitigate some of the damage, by waiting to claim their benefits. For every year you delay benefits past your full retirement age until age 70, you’ll receive an increased benefit of about 8%.

Eligibility for Social Security benefits requires a senior to have earned no less than 40 “credits.” You can earn up to four credits a year, so it takes 10 years of work to qualify for Social Security benefits. In 2020, you have to earn $1,410 to get one Social Security work credit and $5,640 to get the maximum four credits for the year.

Your benefit is based on the 35 years in which you earned the most amount of money. If you have fewer than 35 years of earnings, each year with no earnings is calculated as a zero. You can increase your benefit by swapping out those zero years, by working longer, even if it’s only part-time. However, don’t worry about a low-earning year replacing a higher-earning year. It won’t happen. The benefit isn’t based on 35 consecutive years of work, it’s based on your highest-earning 35 years. As a result, if you decide to ease into retirement by working part-time, you won’t wreck the amount of your Social Security benefit at all, if you have 35 years of higher earnings. If you earn more money, however, your benefit will be adjusted upward—despite the fact that you’re still working while taking your benefit.

There is a maximum benefit amount you can get. However, it depends on your age when you retire. If you retire at full retirement age this year, the maximum monthly benefit is $3,790.

In the past, a great perk of Social Security benefits was that every year, the government would adjust the benefit for inflation. This is called a cost-of-living adjustment, or “COLA.” It’s an inflation protection to help seniors keep up with rising living expenses during retirement.

The COLA is automatic and is quite valuable because purchasing inflation protection on a private annuity can be expensive.

The COLA is calculated based on changes in a federal consumer price index (CPI). The amount of the COLA depends largely on broad inflation levels determined by the federal government.

For 2021, Kiplinger anticipates that there won’t be a Social Security cost of living adjustment. That is due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Reference: Kiplinger (July 30, 2020) “Social Security Shocker: Pandemic to Reduce Benefits by 9% for Americans Turning 60 in 2020”