Can I Afford In-Home Elderly Care?

Staying in-home long-term isn’t always affordable, according to a recent US News and World Report article. The article, entitled “Can You Afford In-Home Elderly Care?”, says about 80% of seniors are concerned about being able to afford in-home health care costs, based on a 2019 SCAN Health Plan survey. Paying for personalized in-home elderly care can add up quickly and isn’t always easy on a senior’s tight income.

If you’re thinking about in-home elderly care, review these criteria to determine what costs to expect and the different payment options available for this type of care.

Find Out the Services Included in In-Home Care for the Elderly. In-home care can vary a lot, depending on your health conditions and needs. You might get helpers if you’re recovering at home from an illness or injury, and you could also have home care workers help you with daily activities, such as preparing meals and personal hygiene. Home care services often include rides to and from appointments, monitoring heart rate and blood pressure and in-home physical and cognitive therapy sessions.

Think about the Level of Care Needed. If you can do most daily activities on your own, but could use help with certain activities, such as cooking or cleaning, home care might be a wise option. In-home care is focused on the service, and it’s supposed to help those who are living on their own as long as possible. When more care is required, moving to a place with more health support may be necessary. Elderly persons who have significant needs may often look to assisted living as an alternative. Assisted living facilities offer more services, like 24-hour emergency care and ongoing supervision for seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other disabilities.

Check Out the Cost of In-Home Senior Care. Homemaker services cost about $22.50 per hour on average and include tasks to help a person with daily duties like laundry, grocery shopping and light housework. An in-home health aide charges an average of $23 per hour, and may help with administering medicine at scheduled times, supervising and monitoring chronic illnesses and helping with walking aids. Of course, the exact cost of these services depends on where you live and the amount of help you need. The monthly cost for in-home care ranges from $4,290 for homemaker services to $4,385 for home health aide care. This typically costs more than the monthly median cost for an assisted living facility—but less than the median cost per month for a room at a nursing home facility.

Know Your Insurance Coverage. If you’re on Medicare, you may be able to get coverage for some short-term home services. To do so, a doctor will need to indicate that skilled nursing care is needed for a short period of time. Medicare will cover speech therapy, occupational therapy, or physical therapy. You can also use it to help with the purchase of durable medical equipment and safety additions to your home. However, Medicare won’t typically cover long-term in-home care services.

Medicaid will cover some health services at home, like cleaning and meal preparation, rides to and from medical visits and personal care. The Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is available in some states, if you have Medicare or Medicaid. It provides some care and services in the home to elderly persons who need a nursing home level of care. If you have long-term care insurance, some in-home services may be covered by your policy.

Look at Other Payment Methods. If your insurance won’t cover in-home care, you might have to pay out-of-pocket. One way to lower costs, is by asking family members to help. If you need to hire more help over time, the cost for services will increase accordingly. If that doesn’t work, they may help pay for in-home elderly care. You can also look at a reverse mortgage, which lets you borrow against your home’s value.

Reference: US News and World Report (June 10, 2020) “Can You Afford In-Home Elderly Care?”

When Do We Need an Elder Law Attorney?

Kiplinger’s article “When Elder Care Requires Legal Advice” explains that this is when a lot of panicked calls are made to elder law attorneys. These elder law attorneys specialize in planning for the legal complications that can arise in old age. However, seldom do people think to consult one preemptively to avoid making that panicked phone call in the first place.

Elder law attorneys work in the best interests of the older person, although how that is accomplished may differ. If the senior is competent and contacts the attorney, it can be fairly straightforward. However, if an adult family member or friend is an agent or has power of attorney for an elderly person—and asks for help, the attorney is representing the agent. In any event, anyone who has power of attorney has a fiduciary responsibility to do what is best for the elderly person granting them that authority.

If a power of attorney isn’t in place and the elderly parent is incapable of giving it, the family is required to go to court to have someone appointed as a guardian, which can be a time-consuming option. If a parent is cognitively capable and doesn’t want help, there’s nothing an attorney can do about it.

Although state laws vary, elder law primarily concerns these topics:

  • The client’s wishes and health
  • Family dynamics; and
  • The client’s financial assets and income.

An elder law attorney will also make sure that all important documents are in place and up-to-date, according to state laws. This includes a will, a trust, a power of attorney and an advance directive that includes a health care proxy.

Elder law attorneys also help moderate tough decisions, like when family members can’t agree about how a loved one wanted to be buried.

In addition, elder care lawyers understand the complex laws for Medicaid and VA benefits. An elder care lawyer can speak to many other issues, ranging from long-term care insurance to capital gains taxes.

A key when meeting with an elder law attorney is that you feel comfortable, that you’re not rushed and that your questions are answered.

Reference: Kiplinger (Sep. 15, 2020) “When Elder Care Requires Legal Advice”

Special Needs Planning for Parents
Individuals with special needs require special consideration in estate planning.

Special Needs Planning for Parents

Public benefits for individuals with special needs include health care, supplemental income, and resources, like day programs and other vital services. Some benefits are based on the individual’s disability status, but others are “needs tested,” where eligibility is determined based on financial resources, as explained in the article “Planning for loved ones with special needs” from NWTimes.com. This distinction is an important consideration in estate planning.

Needs testing” is something that parents must address as part of special needs planning, in concert with their own estate planning. This ensures that the individual’s government benefits will continue, while their family has the comfort of knowing that after the parents die, their child may have access to resources to cover additional costs and maintain a quality of life they may not otherwise have.

Families must be very careful to make informed planning decisions, otherwise their loved ones may lose the benefits they rely upon.

A variety of special planning tools may be used, and the importance of skilled help from an elder law estate planning attorney cannot be overstated.

One family received a “re-determination” letter from the Social Security Administration. This is the process whereby the SSA scrutinizes a person’s eligibility for benefits, based on their possible access to other non-governmental resources. Once the process begins, the potential exists for a disabled person to lose benefits or be required to pay back benefits if they were deemed to have wrongfully received them.

In this case, a woman who lived in California, engaged in a periodic phone call with California Medicaid. California is known for aggressively pursuing on-going benefits eligibility. The woman mentioned a trust that had been created as a result of estate planning done by her late father. The brief mention was enough to spark an in-depth review of planning. The SSA requested no less than 15 different items, including estate documents, account history and a review of all disbursements for the last two years.

The process has created a tremendous amount of stress for the woman and for her family. The re-determination will also create expenses, as the attorney who drafted the original trust in Indiana, where the father lived, will need to work with a special needs attorney in California, who is knowledgeable about the process in the state.

Similar to estate planning, the special needs process required by Medicaid and the SSA is a constantly evolving process, and not a “one-and-done” transaction. Special needs and estate planning documents created as recently as three or four years ago should be reviewed.

Our specialized team has the tools to tackle your estate planning needs, from Medicaid support to planning for people with special needs.

Reference: NWTimes.com (June 21, 2020) “Planning for loved ones with special needs”