Can I Afford In-Home Elderly Care?

Staying in-home long-term isn’t always affordable, according to a recent US News and World Report article. The article, entitled “Can You Afford In-Home Elderly Care?”, says about 80% of seniors are concerned about being able to afford in-home health care costs, based on a 2019 SCAN Health Plan survey. Paying for personalized in-home elderly care can add up quickly and isn’t always easy on a senior’s tight income.

If you’re thinking about in-home elderly care, review these criteria to determine what costs to expect and the different payment options available for this type of care.

Find Out the Services Included in In-Home Care for the Elderly. In-home care can vary a lot, depending on your health conditions and needs. You might get helpers if you’re recovering at home from an illness or injury, and you could also have home care workers help you with daily activities, such as preparing meals and personal hygiene. Home care services often include rides to and from appointments, monitoring heart rate and blood pressure and in-home physical and cognitive therapy sessions.

Think about the Level of Care Needed. If you can do most daily activities on your own, but could use help with certain activities, such as cooking or cleaning, home care might be a wise option. In-home care is focused on the service, and it’s supposed to help those who are living on their own as long as possible. When more care is required, moving to a place with more health support may be necessary. Elderly persons who have significant needs may often look to assisted living as an alternative. Assisted living facilities offer more services, like 24-hour emergency care and ongoing supervision for seniors with Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other disabilities.

Check Out the Cost of In-Home Senior Care. Homemaker services cost about $22.50 per hour on average and include tasks to help a person with daily duties like laundry, grocery shopping and light housework. An in-home health aide charges an average of $23 per hour, and may help with administering medicine at scheduled times, supervising and monitoring chronic illnesses and helping with walking aids. Of course, the exact cost of these services depends on where you live and the amount of help you need. The monthly cost for in-home care ranges from $4,290 for homemaker services to $4,385 for home health aide care. This typically costs more than the monthly median cost for an assisted living facility—but less than the median cost per month for a room at a nursing home facility.

Know Your Insurance Coverage. If you’re on Medicare, you may be able to get coverage for some short-term home services. To do so, a doctor will need to indicate that skilled nursing care is needed for a short period of time. Medicare will cover speech therapy, occupational therapy, or physical therapy. You can also use it to help with the purchase of durable medical equipment and safety additions to your home. However, Medicare won’t typically cover long-term in-home care services.

Medicaid will cover some health services at home, like cleaning and meal preparation, rides to and from medical visits and personal care. The Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is available in some states, if you have Medicare or Medicaid. It provides some care and services in the home to elderly persons who need a nursing home level of care. If you have long-term care insurance, some in-home services may be covered by your policy.

Look at Other Payment Methods. If your insurance won’t cover in-home care, you might have to pay out-of-pocket. One way to lower costs, is by asking family members to help. If you need to hire more help over time, the cost for services will increase accordingly. If that doesn’t work, they may help pay for in-home elderly care. You can also look at a reverse mortgage, which lets you borrow against your home’s value.

Reference: US News and World Report (June 10, 2020) “Can You Afford In-Home Elderly Care?”

Nursing Homes Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis
COVID-19 has drastically altered life for residents of nursing homes.

Nursing Homes Impacted by COVID-19 Crisis

Yahoo Finance’s recent article entitled “U.S. nursing homes face ‘a crisis on top of a crisis’ with coronavirus and funding woes” explains that the nursing home industry has been facing a financial shortfall since at least 2013, particularly for non-Medicare margins, according to the American Health Care Association (AHCA). Non-Medicare margins are the revenues and costs associated with Medicaid and private payers for all lines of business. They dropped 3% in 2018, an increase from the year prior. The industry has been in financial disarray long before the COVID-19 crisis.

Lack of funding is a big issue for nursing homes. “You layer COVID on top of that and… it’s a crisis on top of a crisis,” David Grabowski, a professor of health care policy at Harvard Medical School, told Yahoo Finance. “And that you started with a lot of nursing homes that didn’t have adequate staffing models, weren’t exactly strong at infection control, lacked resources in many, many regards, and then this hits, it’s definitely the industry.”

“Over 60% of people in the country that live in nursing facilities are dependent upon Medicaid,” AHCA President and CEO Mark Parkinson told Yahoo Finance. “And unfortunately, in most states, the Medicaid rates have been set at less than the actual cost to take care of the residents. So, it makes it very difficult to provide the kind of care that providers want when they’re underfunded so dramatically.”

In addition, Parkinson commented, “most of the people don’t understand that Medicaid is really a middle-class benefit, because if people live long enough to outlive their resources, it’s the only way that they can afford to be taken care of in a facility.”

Medicaid is a federal benefits program that gives health coverage to seniors, pregnant women, children, people with disabilities and eligible low-income adults. However, the federal government permits states to level the payment amounts long as they meet federal requirements.

“The failure to adequately fund Medicaid is primarily a problem with the states,” Parkinson said. “Each state gets to make its own decision on what its reimbursement will be for Medicaid. Although the national average is around $200 a day, the rate varies dramatically by states, and some states are as low as less than $150 a day. In the low funding states, like Illinois and Texas, the politicians just haven’t decided it’s an important enough priority to adequately fund it.”

According to the New York Times, the COVID-19 crisis that has swept the nation has infected more than 282,000 people at about 12,000 facilities as of June 26. It has killed more than 54,000. There are roughly 15,600 nursing homes in the U.S., with more than 1.3 million residents and over 1.6 million staff.

“It’s important to note that COVID hasn’t discriminated, so it’s not just those worst-quality nursing homes that have seen cases,” Grabowski said. “It’s been equally apparent across the high quality and low-quality facilities, high Medicaid and low Medicaid facilities. We’ve found that it’s really about where you’re located that has driven these cases.”

Adding to the financial situation is the fact that testing for coronavirus in the thousands of nursing homes across the country can be very expensive. The AHCA and National Center for Assisted Living (NCAL) found that testing every U.S. nursing home resident and staff member just once, would cost $440 million. As the pandemic continues, more supplies are also needed. A recent NCAL survey found that many assisted living communities are running low on PPE (N95 masks, surgical face masks, face shields, gowns, and gloves).

Parkinson says, it’s a “failure to recognize the importance of the elderly. It’s a conscious political decision to underfund elder care,” he said. “It’s not defensible on any level, but it’s occurring in the vast majority of states.”

Nursing homes were hardly prepared for the COVID-19 crisis. He went on to say that with more funding, nursing homes can be better prepared for the next health crisis.

Reference: Yahoo Finance (June 30, 2020) “U.S. nursing homes face ‘a crisis on top of a crisis’ with coronavirus and funding woes”

When Planning for Retirement, Don’t Forget About Long Term Care Insurance

Roughly 60% of those turning 65 can anticipate using some form of long-term care in their lives, according to the U.S. Health and Human Services Department. Those individuals may be faced with a nursing home, assisted living, or in-home care.  The costs associated with these types of care make elder law planning extremely important.  This is one reason individuals should consider the possibility of long-term care insurance.

CNBC’s recent article, “Not having long-term care insurance can be ‘the single biggest devastator’ of your financial plan,” reports that over 8 million Americans have long-term care insurance. However, the cost of that insurance is rising. The increase is due to several factors, including the fact that companies under priced their policies for years and misjudged how many would drop coverage.  Because of those rising premiums, some individuals may choose self-insurance.  That means saving a pool of money to earmark for long-term care. Coverage is also available through Medicaid, which has eligibility requirements.  Despite these increases, when planning, one should consider purchasing  some form of coverage. This is because not being insured can be the biggest devastator of a financial plan.

long-term care checklist

The rule of thumb has been to buy LTC coverage at age 55. However, it really depends on your situation. The big unknown is health, and the odds of being able to qualify for coverage at age 60, compared to age 30 or 40, is vastly different.

A traditional LTC policy will cover the costs of care for a certain period of time, generally up to six years. The amount of coverage is based on the average cost of care for your location. Most insurers offer it in the form of a monthly benefit, and possibly with some inflation protection.  There’s also a hybrid policy that covers long-term care costs, but becomes life insurance paid to heirs, if it’s not used. Of the 350,000 Americans who purchased long-term care protection in 2018, 85% chose the hybrid coverage. It’s also called combo or linked-benefit. The big difference between a traditional LTC policy and the hybrid policy is you’ll pay more for the hybrid policy.

The attorneys at Michael T. Huguelet, P.C. would be happy to discuss your options for long term care planning and the benefits of long term care insurance so you have piece of mind that your assets are preserved and left to those who mean the most to you.  If you are looking for long-term care planning in Orland Park, Illinois or the surrounding suburbs of Chicago, please give us a call.

Reference: CNBC (October 14, 2019) “Not having long-term care insurance can be ‘the single biggest devastator’ of your financial plan”

 

Long-Term Care Planning is Important

The expense of long-term care is often astronomical. Many people who end up requiring long-term care initially pay for it out of their own their own assets.  Medicaid is the federal program that assists with healthcare benefits for those who qualify and cannot afford them.  Many people end up accessing Medicaid benefits, after their own assets have been depleted.  The Medicaid program can help with paying for home care, assisted living, and nursing home care, explains Insurance News Net’s recent article, “Medicaid planning.”

long-term care planning

Speaking with an elder law or Medicaid planning attorney is a great idea to make sure people can qualify for Medicaid before they completely exhaust their resources.  These practitioners specialize in helping people qualify for Medicaid benefits far in advance of their assets becoming depleted.

For those who are thinking of transferring all of their assets to their children to qualify for Medicaid, the government has already thought of that. If you gift any assets to your children, you may be subject to a penalty before becoming Medicaid eligible. However, there are perfectly legal strategies that a senior can use to become eligible for Medicaid, while still keeping considerable assets.  Assets may be freely transferred between spouses to help gain eligibility for a spouse that needs care.  There are also many assets that are exempt for purposes of gaining eligibility.

With the guidance and planning from qualified legal counsel, seniors who require long-term care can get assistance with their healthcare from the government, while preserving assets for their loved ones.

The attorneys at Michael T. Huguelet, P.C. would be happy to sit down with you and assist with long term care planning so you have piece of mind that your assets are preserved and left to those who mean the most to you.  If you are looking for long term care planning in Orland Park, Illinois or the surrounding suburbs of Chicago, please give us a call.

Reference: Insurance News Net (September 29, 2019) “Medicaid planning”